How Is He Still Owned?

The problem with writing a blog about fantasy baseball is that you give away your secrets, opinions, and tricks, and if your league-mates see what you write, well, good-bye to whatever advantage you may have had. Oh well.

Anyways, today I was looking through the owned percentage list on Yahoo, and I was astounded by the some of the hitters that are still owned in a large majority of leagues, giving me an idea for a column. With that, I present to you “How Is He Still Owned?”, the fantasy baseball version of John Oliver’s “How Is This Still A Thing?”.

The five hitters on this list are owned in over three quarters of Yahoo leagues, which just makes you wonder: “How Is He Still Owned?”.

Jorge Soler (owned in 80% of leagues): Soler is, to me, one of the most overrated players in the game. His main appeal is that he’s young and that he’s part of Chicago Cubs elite hitting prospect parade. The problem with him, though, aside from the fact that he’s currently on the DL with an ankle injury, is that he strikes out. A lot. That’d be fine if he were George Springer, who counteracts his copious amounts of strikeouts with a bunch of home runs and stolen bases, but Soler has been subpar across the board so far this season.

Yadier Molina (85%): Molina has such a great reputation that people seem to forget that, although he’s a great baseball player, he isn’t good for fantasy. In fact, he’s extremely overrated. In his twelve year career, although his average has consistently been good, Molina has topped fourteen home runs once, 65 RBIs twice, and he’s never had more than 68 runs. Despite all this, Molina was drafted in the ninth round in my twelve-team league this year, right in front of Mookie Betts and Jake Arrieta. He’s ranked sixteenth on the ESPN Player Rater, just behind the immortal Michael McKenry, Colorado’s backup catcher. McKenry’s owned in 1% of Yahoo leagues, and that’s a lot closer to where Molina’s ownership percentage should be too.

Mark Trumbo (83%): What’s not to love about a power hitter with nine home runs. accompanied by a sparkling 278 OBP and subpar counting stats? And this superstar is somehow owned in more than eight out of ten leagues? Nori Aoki and Dexter Fowler are all somehow less owned than Trumbo. How is that possible?

David Wright (76%): This pains me deeply, as a long-suffering Mets fan, but David Wright should not be owned in 76% of leagues. He’s often injured, he’s been out for a couple of months, and there’s no timetable for his return. Even last year, when he was healthy, Wright was significantly below average in all counting stats. There’s no way his performance and outlook for the future warrant that high of an ownership percentage.

Jason Heyward (87%): Heyward is almost as overrated as Molina, his teammate on the Cardinals. Heyward’s an amazing defensive outfielder, which is why the Shelby Miller swap with the Braves isn’t as bad as it seems for St. Louis. However, while Heyward is a defensive wizard, he’s regressed significantly since his 20-20 season in 2012. OPS is a nice simple statistic to use for player evaluations since it combines the ability to hit for power and the ability to get on base. Heyward’s is .676, which isn’t rosterable in any but the deepest formats, but, despite this, he’s still somehow wasting a roster spot in most leagues.

I guess the important question to ask about each of these five players is: “How Is He Still Owned?”

If you have any questions about fantasy baseball, individual players, trade offers, rest of season outlooks, or anything else, email me at sushi.krox@gmail.com and I’ll answer your question on Sushi On Sports

1 thought on “How Is He Still Owned?

  1. Pingback: Mailbag: Jason Heyward and Joey Gallo | Sushi on Sports

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